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Millennium Goals Essay Introduction

Millennium Development Goals Essay

Introduction
The Millennium Declaration, sanctioned by 189 global leaders in September 2000, served as a commitment to work hand in hand to build a safer, more equitable, and prosperous world. The affirmation was translated into a roadmap laying out eight measurable and time-bound goals to be attained by 2015, christened the “Millennium Development Goals” (MDGs). The eight goals are correlated and should be considered as a whole. However, due to a combination of climate change, high food prices, the effect of the global economic and financial crisis, discrepancies in MDG attainment are widespread within and between countries.
The first MDG aims at eradicating extreme poverty and hunger across the globe. This goal is further split into three targets. One of these targets is triggered towards halving the number of those earning less than $1 per day. The other target is geared towards halving the number of people suffering from hunger across the world. The third target is to attain full and productive employment and work for all. The second MDG aims at achieving universal primary education. The primary target of this goal is to ensure that every child across the globe is able to complete a full course of primary schooling.
History of Socioeconomic, Health, and Environmental Issues that led to the Development of MDG 1 and MDG 2
The United Nations continuously set goals aimed at enhancing humanity. Most of the goals set in the past have centered on reducing poverty and hunger across the globe. The first goals related to education, and they were a product of three regional conventions prepared by UNECO in 1960. These goals targeted the expansion of basic education within a timeframe of two decades. Economic goals have also been put in place, albeit the achievement of economic goals has remained a nightmare especially in the developing world.
Poverty reduction has also received very sharp attention by the UN over the past decade. Poverty is a socioeconomic problem. Socioeconomic problems are those problems that negatively impact a person’s economic activity including corruption, unemployment, overpopulation, religious and cultural discrimination, and lack of education. Around the globe, abject poverty is widespread in regions where lack of education and poor health deprive people of productive capability; environmental resources have been spoiled or depleted; and conflict, corruption, and bad governance discourage private investment and waste public resources. In the quest to end poverty across the world, the UN formulates policies aimed at enlightening the global community on how to handle these issues. Today, the World Bank estimates indicate that over 1 billion people continue to languish in poverty. Inequality measures also indicate a rising trend in many developing countries.
Lack of education in many developing countries can be attributed to financial constraints that characterize these regions. Before the formulation of MDGs children in...

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Introduction The United Nations Organization (UNO) has been at work for decades in order to make this world a better place to live in. This is done by giving the leaders from every country to come up and discuss the global happenings on a neutral platform in order to make sure that the concerns and the difficulties of each country are properly heard. Similarly, one aspect of the UNO is to monitor the global events by itself and, when the time comes, should interfere to make sure that such events do not have a long term impact on the political stability on the region. With the start of the new millennium, the UNO took a very positive initiative in setting a target year in which eight of the world’s most critical problems had to be…show more content…

Once done, the War with Iraq and Lebanon are also one of the examples which not only affected these countries, but also had an economic impact on the neighboring countries. Thus while some regions have progressed significantly in reaching these MDGs, the rest are still struggling to even stabilize their economy so that they can focus on these goals. The fact of the matter is that in making these goals, the Millennium Summit had no idea that radical change that will come in the global political scenario. The new millennium has started off with an increase in terrorism activities all over the world due to which the countries are now focused on making sure that they are able to provide their people the security they need. These 8 MDGs had not taken into account the national security of each country and with a continuous growth in the terrorist activities; we find that the countries are constantly engaged in finding new alternatives to make sure that they become a terrorism free nation (James 2007). It is due to these reasons why the countries have shifted their focus form the MDGs and are now focused on making sure that they are able to avoid any such activities by keeping a constant check on their people. It is not that I am saying that the creation of these Millennium Development Goals had been a wasteful exercise; it is rather a very good initiative taken by the UNO in order to make sure that the world becomes a better

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